2018/0004 The Great Echo Chamber

The Great Echo Chamber

Artist

Dianne JONES
Indigenous
Birth:
1966
 in
Northam, Western Australia

Artwork

Title
The Great Echo Chamber
Date
2017
Medium/Material
ink jet print on paper
Dimensions
120.0 x 180.0cm (Height x Width x Depth)
Credit line
Purchased through The Leah Jane Cohen Bequest, Art Gallery of Western Australia Foundation, 2018
State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia
Accession Number
2018/0004
Currently not on display

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Extended Label

Dianne Jones Artist statementThis series of images plays on ‘the idea for The Grand Tour’, a tradition whereby young men of British nobility (and some women with a chaperone) would literally tour the European continent as an educational rite of passage’. ‘The Grand Tour’ was for the ‘Grand Tourist’ to learn of the cultural legacy of the ‘classics’ and the Renaissance, study the great art works and listen to great music. The ‘Grand Tour’ has been described as the search the ‘roots of civilisation’ and critiqued as essential to ensuring ruling class control through the maintenance of cultural hegemony. As a Noongar artist invited to spend time in Parliament house I was taken on tours of the building, its many rooms, halls and artworks. I witnessed tours regularly. I learnt about the many symbols and traditions that evoke how a culture creats a sense of grandeur befitting the gravitas of ‘founding a nation’ the historical ties with Britain, the solemn rituals required for power to make laws impacting us, every day. The height, the arches, the statues and the leather-bound books are crafted to induce awe, to speak of some divine right to possess and govern. I am not a tourist here on Noongar land.

Artist statement, 2018This series of images plays on ‘the idea for The Grand Tour’, a tradition whereby young men of British nobility (and some women with a chaperone) would literally tour the European continent as an educational ‘rite of passage’. ‘The Grand Tour’ was for the ‘Grand Tourist’ to learn of the cultural legacy of the ‘classics’ and the Renaissance, study the great art works and listen to great music. The ‘Grand Tour’ has been described as the search for the ‘roots of civilisation’ and critiqued as essential to ensuring ruling class control through the maintenance of cultural hegemony. As a Noongar artist invited to spend time in Parliament house I was taken on tours of the building, its many rooms, halls and artworks. I witnessed tours regularly. I learnt about the many symbols and traditions that evoke how a culture creates a sense of grandeur befitting the gravitas of ‘founding a nation’, the historical ties with Britain, the solemn rituals required for power to make laws impacting us, every day. The height, the arches, the statues and the leather-bound books are crafted to induce awe, to speak of some divine right to possess and govern. I am not a tourist here on Noongar land.

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