2014/0079 Dayiwul Ngarrangkarni

Dayiwul Ngarrangkarni

Artist

Lena NYADBI
Aboriginal/Indigenous
Birth:
c 1936
 in
Walmanjilukum, Bow River Station (previously Greenvale Station), Northern Territory

Artwork

Title
Dayiwul Ngarrangkarni
Date
2008
Medium/Material
etching on Hahnemuhle paper
Dimensions
50.0 x 39.0cm (image)55.0 x 70.0cm (paper) (Height x Width x Depth)
Credit line
Purchased through The Leah Jane Cohen Bequest, Art Gallery of Western Australia Foundation, 2014
State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia
Accession Number
2014/0079
Currently not on display

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Extended Label

The print tells a creation story for a place in the Kimberley that was destroyed by the Argyle Diamond mine “The long white shape… is the spinifex net made by three women in the Ngarrangkarni (Dreaming). They travelled up the river, placing the net across the water to catch fish. Halfway to Gawinji (Cattle Creek) the women stopped and left the next; it turned to stone… The large round shapes are Ngarrangkarni Rocks that were shifted to a place… Where they remain today… The diamonds being mined are the scales of Dayiwul, the Barramundi, who jumped through the range to escape the women: she saw the net they placed in the river and jumped over it.”

Curatorial insightThe long white shape is the spinifex net made by the three women in the Ngarrangkarni (Dreaming). They travelled up the river placing the net across the water to catch the fish. Halfway to Gawinji (Cattle Creek) the women stopped and left the net at this place; it turned to stone. This place was destroyed when the Argyle Diamond Mine was first cut. The large brown shapes are Ngarrangkarni rocks that were removed and shifted to a place higher up where they remain today. Nyadbi says there was a creek here and a soak where Gija people used to dig down into the ground for water when other waterholes had dried up. The diamonds mined today are the scales of Dayiwul the barramundi who jumped through the range to escape capture by the three women. She saw the net they had placed in the river and jumped over it. These sites have been destroyed by the pit of the open-cut mine. Nyadbi has made this work to remember this country before the mine and to pass these stories and this history on to her children and grandchildren. (Warmun Art Centre 2008)

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Vernon id: 21220