2007/0277 Bush Plum Country

Bush Plum Country

Artist

Angelina NGAL
Aboriginal/Indigenous
Birth:
c 1947
 in
Australia

Artwork

Title
Bush Plum Country
Date
2006
Medium/Material
Synthetic polymer on linen
Dimensions
Uneven, max image dimensions: 200.2 x 119.2cm (unstretched) (Height x Width x Depth)
Credit line
Gift of Lauraine Diggins, 2007
State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia
Accession Number
2007/0277
Currently not on display

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Extended Label

Angelina Ngal, together with her sisters Kathleen and Poly, began producing the now famous batiks at Utopia in 1986. She has since adapted this style to painting on canvas.It is largely through this medium that Angelina Ngal has gained international recognition, although she has also produced carved wooden sculptures.The two works by Angelina Ngal depict a contemporary dialogue or translation of the cultural, geographic, social and religious components of community life. Ngal depictsher grandfather:'s country, Arlparra, in the first work and aspects of the Bush Plum Dreaming, for which she is joint custodian, in the second. Both works contain a layer oftranslation ·of points of geography, elements of knowledge of places, and memories of hunting and ceremonial business. The subtle and textured surfaces of the worksprovide a hintto the viewer of the richly layered interpretations of narrative beneath.MR 15/10/18

Curatorial insightAngelina Ngal, together with her sisters Kathleen and Poly, began producing the now famous batiks at Utopia in 1986, and adapted this style to painting on canvas. It is largely through painting that Angelina has gained international recognition, although she has also produced carved wooden sculptures. Angelina's work represents a contemporary dialogue or translation of the cultural, geographic, social and religious components of community life. In this work she depicts aspects of the Bush Plum Dreaming, for which she is joint custodian. The subtle and textured surfaces of the work provide a hint to the viewer of the richly layered interpretations of narrative beneath. (AGWA 2007)

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Vernon id: 18096