1993/0101 Flashing Lighthouse. Cape Levique (Ilma - ceremonial emblem)

Flashing Lighthouse. Cape Levique (Ilma - ceremonial emblem)

Artist

Roy WIGGAN
Aboriginal/Indigenous
Birth:
13 May 1930
 in
Sunday Island, Western Australia
Death:
2015
 in
Broome, Western Australia

Artwork

Title
Flashing Lighthouse. Cape Levique (Ilma - ceremonial emblem)
Date
1993
Medium/Material
wood, paint, wool and cotton
Dimensions
107 x 32.5cm (irregular) (Height x Width x Depth)
Credit line
Purchased 1993
State Art Collection, Art Gallery of Western Australia
Accession Number
1993/0101
Currently not on display

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Curatorial insightIlma is an all-embracing term covering both open ceremonies performed by the Bardi and other Dampierland peoples and the objects used in them. Ilma ceremonies are composed and owned by individual men. These men are said to have received the songs (words and music), and the form of the dances (choreography) from Rai spirits of dead men. The ilma emblems are derived from thread-cross artefacts, once originally made from hair or animal-fur string and constructed on frameworks of sticks, spears or, in some areas sacred boards. Throughout much of Australia such constructions are classed among the most important sacred objects. In the north Kimberley and Dampierland Peninsula they are primarily used in open or public dances. Balga dances – such as Wanalirri, composed by the late Wattie Ngerdu, Cyclone Tracy, composed by the late Geoffrey Mangalamarra, and Gurirr Gurirr, composed by the late Rover Thomas – all feature such emblems. (Akerman, Images of Power: Aboriginal art of the Kimberley, 1993)

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Vernon id: 13173